Pequannock Lacrosse Club, a 501(c)3 non-profit, is devoted to introducing and teaching lacrosse to all children with an emphasis on fun. The club is completely supported by membership registration fees, fund-raising activities, and the generous contributi
 
 
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SINGLE SPORT ATHLETES AT RISK
01/12/2017
STUDY FROM NFHS     Injury Rates Higher for...
Equipment Fitting Guide - BOYS AND GIRLS
01/04/2017
US Lacrosse recently published an Equipment Fitting Guide to help...
WINTER/SPRING LAX REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
11/25/2016
WINTER AND SPRING LACROSSE REGISTRATION  *NEW PLAYERS...
About Us.
04/02/2013
OUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES: Pequannock Junior Lacrosse Club is committed...
 
SINGLE SPORT ATHLETES AT RISK

 

The issue of whether high school student-athletes should specialize in one sport or play multiple sports continues to be debated across the country. How prevalent is the practice of specialization and what are the potential drawbacks for individuals who focus on a single sport?

In an effort to find answers to some questions related to sport specialization, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Foundation funded a study conducted by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. While the primary focus of the study was to determine the injury rate for those athletes who specialize in one sport vs. individuals who do not specialize in one sport, the study also provided information about the rate of specialization by male and female athletes.

The study was conducted throughout the 2015-16 school year at 29 high schools in Wisconsin involving more than 1,500 student-athletes equally divided between male and female participants. The schools involved in the study represented a mixture of rural (14), suburban (12) and urban (3) areas, and enrollments were equally diverse with 10 small schools (less than 500 students), 10 medium schools (501-1,000 students) and nine large schools (more than 1,000 students).

From an injury standpoint, the study indicated that high school athletes who specialize in a single sport sustain lower-extremity injuries at significantly higher rates than athletes who do not specialize in one sport.

Athletes who specialized in one sport were twice as likely to report previously sustaining a lower-extremity injury while participating in sports (46%) than athletes who did not specialize (24%). In addition, specialized athletes sustained 60 percent more new lower-extremity injuries during the study than athletes who did not specialize. Lower-extremity injuries were defined as any acute, gradual, recurrent or repetitive-use injury to the lower musculoskeletal system.

“While we have long believed that sport specialization by high school athletes leads to an increased risk of overuse injury, this study confirms those beliefs about the potential risks of sport specialization,” said Bob Gardner, NFHS executive director. “Coaches, parents and student-athletes need to be aware of the injury risks involved with an overemphasis in a single sport.”

Among those who reported previously sustaining a lower-extremity injury, the areas of the body injured most often were the ankle (43%) and knee (23%). The most common type of previous injuries were ligament sprains (51%) and muscle/tendon strains (20%).

New injuries during the year-long study occurred most often to the ankle (34%), knee (25%) and upper leg (13%), with the most common injuries being ligament sprains (41%), muscle/tendon strains (25%) and tendonitis (20%).

In addition, specialized athletes were twice as likely to sustain a gradual onset/repetitive-use injury than athletes who did not specialize, and those who specialized were more likely to sustain an injury even when controlling for gender, grade, previous injury status and sport.

The student-athletes involved in the study were deemed “specialized” if they answered “yes” to at least four of the following six questions: 1) Do you train more than 75 percent of the time in your primary sport?; 2) Do you train to improve skill and miss time with friends as a result?; 3) Have you quit another sport to focus on one sport?; 4) Do you consider your primary sport more important than your other sports?; 5) Do you regularly travel out of state for your primary sport?; 6) Do you train more than eight months a year in your primary sport?

Thirty-four percent of the student-athletes involved in the Wisconsin study specialized in one sport, with females (41%) more likely to specialize than males (28%). Soccer had the highest level of specialization for both males (45%) and females (49%). After soccer, the rate of specialization for females was highest for softball (45%), volleyball (43%) and basketball (37%). The top specialization sports for males after soccer were basketball (37%), tennis (33%) and wrestling (29%). The sports with lowest levels of specialization were football (16%) for boys and track and field (15%) for girls.

The study, which was directed by Timothy McGuine, Ph.D., ATC, of the University of Wisconsin, also documented the effects of concurrent sport participation (participating in an interscholastic sport while simultaneously participating in an out-of-school club sport), which indicated further risk of athletes sustaining lower-extremity injuries.

Almost 50 percent of the student-athletes involved in the survey indicated they participated on a club team outside the school setting, and 15 percent of those individuals did so while simultaneously competing in a different sport within the school. Seventeen (17) percent of the student-athletes indicated that they took part in 60 or more primary sport competitions (school and club) in a single year. Among those student-athletes in this group who sustained new lower-extremity injuries during the year, 27 percent were athletes who specialized in one sport.

Although some sports (field hockey, lacrosse) are not offered in Wisconsin and were not included in the study, the study concluded that since specialization increased the risk of lower-extremity injuries in sports involved in the survey it would also likely increase the risk of injuries in sports that were not a part of the study.


by posted 01/12/2017
Equipment Fitting Guide - BOYS AND GIRLS

US Lacrosse recently published an Equipment Fitting Guide to help provide first-time buyers, parents and players with suggested guidelines in purchasing equipment. Designed to help both the boys’ and girls’ youth player, the guide explains how lacrosse equipment should feel when properly worn. Photographs and descriptions for both field players and goalies are featured.

CLICK HERE:


by posted 01/04/2017
WINTER/SPRING LAX REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

WINTER AND SPRING LACROSSE REGISTRATION

 *NEW PLAYERS WELCOME*

All Registration online at www.pequannocklacrosse.org

 

YOUTH WINTER PROGRAMS START FIRST WEEK OF JANUARY

 

BOYS AND GIRLS WINTER CLINICS

  • Boys and Girls, Grade 3-8 
  • 8-Session Winter Clinic (Runs Jan - Feb). 
  • Ideal for new or returning players
  • Girls, Thursdays 5-6 pm
  • Boys, Friday, 4-5 pm
  • Cost $125 (plus 1x US Lacrosse Membership)
  • Indoors at The Sports Factory, Lincoln Park.

                                                                    

BOYS AND GIRLS SPRING TEAMS:

  • Boys and Girls Spring Travel Programs (Runs March – early June)
  • Grades 3-8. New Players Welcome.  Everyone Plays.
  • Cost is $195 + US Lacrosse Membership.  (1 x per year)
  • Save $25 if you Register Prior to Feb 1 (Cost = $170 + US Lacrosse Membership)
  • $5 Discount for second and third child.
  • Equipment required (Loaner equipment available. Very Limited supplies).
  • Uniforms provided to new players.

Girls 2nd Grade Clinic and Scrimmages (April – June)

  • Information to follow.  Registration to open shortly.

Co-ed Soft Lacrosse Program (April - June)

  • Information to follow. Registration to open shortly.

 

And please follow us on Facebook, Instagam and Twitter.


by posted 11/25/2016
About Us.
OUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES:
Pequannock Junior Lacrosse Club is committed to promoting and developing the sport of lacrosse and encouraging youth athletes in Pequannock with an emphasis on teaching, sportsmanship, and fun.
 
GOALS AND HOPES
  • Every player will enjoy the sport at least as much at the end of the season as at the beginning
  • Every player’s skill and tactical knowledge of the sport will improve
  • Every players will get chances to test themselves in game situations
  • Every players will want to play the sport next year
  • The parents will enjoy the season as much as the athletes
 
ABOUT US:
The Pequannock Lacrosse Club, Inc., a non-profit 501 (c) 3 corporation founded in 2003, is focused on developing lacrosse programs for boys and girls in Pequannock Township.  The programs are affiliated with U.S. Lacrosse, Inc. – the official governing body of lacrosse – and the New Jersey Junior Lacrosse League and are recognized by the Pequannock Dept. of Parks and Recreation and the Pequannock Board of Education.

by posted 04/02/2013
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